Category Archives: Call for Papers

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS (Edited Collection): Legacies and Lifespans

 CALL FOR ABSTRACTS (Edited Collection): Legacies and Lifespans

A new book edited by Gina Wisker, Heidi Yeandle and Leanne Bibby

collection based on that of our 10th anniversary conference in 2015, Legacies and Lifespans: Contemporary Women’s Writing in the Twenty-First Century

Please submit abstracts and any queries to legaciesandlifespans@gmail.com by 15 September 2017.

Legacies and Lifespans

Call for abstracts

The field of Contemporary Women’s Writing focuses on women’s writing from 1970-present and is suggestive of continuity, while also indicating a distinction from the female authored works which came before.

This book has a double focus. We are particularly looking for chapters that look backwards and/or forwards, and examine the connections between women writers from the late twentieth century and the twenty-first century. The book aims to focus on how twenty-first-century female writers look back and respond to their predecessors within the field of Contemporary Women’s Writing. As well as looking back to the foundations of Contemporary Women’s Writing, the book will look forward, and consider how Contemporary Women’s Writing will be defined in future decades. With a global outlook, we are seeking chapters that examine the legacies of foundational writers and texts and explore how women writers from the twenty-first century respond to these influential authors and seminal works, and how they deal with new issues in new ways. Chapters are invited which focus on prose fiction, poetry, drama and other forms of Contemporary Women’s writing.

Topics include – but are not limited to:

  • The politics of rewriting the past and imagining the future;
  • New genres / new forms;
  • The future of feminist literary criticism;
  • Writing in an age of crisis;
  • Defining the contemporary;
  • Legacies and influences of well-known or less well-known women’s writing on Contemporary Women’s writing;
  • Historical fiction;
  • Utopian/dystopian fiction;
  • Women’s science fiction, fantasy, horror, crime;
  • Feminist genealogies and generations;
  • Gendered temporalities;
  • Women’s writing and new technologies;
  • Women’s writing and the literary market place

Please send 250 word abstracts to legaciesandlifespans@gmail.com by 15 September 2017.

Final chapters should be up to 8,000 words in length and will be due by April 30th 2018.

CFP for Michele Roberts conference

  1. An International Conference

Reading Michèle Roberts

organised by

Department of British Literature and Culture, University of Lodz , Poland

7-8 September 2017

call for papers 

Call for Papers

Michèle Roberts is an author who escapes easy classifications, her books being as rich and complex as her personal history and the sources of her inspiration. Born in an Anglo-French family and raised in a repressive Catholic background, she has blossomed into a writer who draws inspiration from this complex heritage without being inhibited by its limitations. In consequence, her oeuvre—which includes novels, short stories, poems, essays and theatrical plays—offers a seemingly effortless marriage of oppositions. Like no other contemporary writer, Roberts combines spirituality with sensuality, engages literary tradition in the service of radical experiment and employs religious motifs and images to express progressive feminist ideas. Provocative and witty, her work ranges far beyond the trio of “food, sex and God” that she jokingly named as her principal thematic concerns.

The conference offers a rare opportunity to reflect on Michèle Roberts’s achievement by bringing together scholars interested in her writings. Papers are invited on all aspects of the author’s work. They may concentrate on particular texts or address recurrent themes, motifs and formal strategies. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

·       spirituality and religion

·       feminist theology

·       sensuality, desire and sexuality

·       literary representation of sensory experience

·       (maternal) body

·       male/female dynamics

·       family dynamics

·       female space(s)

·       feminine experience and identity

·       history, memory and the past

·       intertextuality: tradition and the practice of “writing back”

·       historical, literary and biblical inspirations

·       narrative technique and formal experiments

·       metafictionality

·       representations of London / representations of small-town France

·       language, symbolism, recurrent images and metaphors

·       society, ideology and politics

We take pleasure in announcing that Michèle Roberts has kindly accepted our invitation to be a special guest speaker during the conference. Her presence will give the participants a unique opportunity to discuss their research ideas with the author.

 

Proposed presentations should be 20 minutes long. Please submit an abstract of 200-300 words, including the title of your presentation and a brief academic CV to reading.lodz.conference@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is 1 June 2017  and the participants will be notified by 15 June 2017.

 For further information, please visit the website http://www.reading.uni.lodz.pl/

 

CALL FOR PAPERS! CONVENTION AND REVOLUTION “Life writing by women in the 1800s and 1900s: archives, critiques and methods”

CONVENTION AND REVOLUTION
Life writing by women in the 1800s and 1900s: archives, critiques and methods
29 November -1 December 2017 Warsaw, Poland

deadline for submissions: April 30, 2017

 
CONVENTION AND REVOLUTION – call for papers
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM_1

Organizers: Institute of Literary Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Digital Humanities Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Institute of Slavic Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences

Long hours in the archives. Raise your hand if you have never yawned over letters of journals written by women of the centuries past. (No hands go up.) The thoughts creep in: this is so boring, so conventional, so predictable – and there’s another pile of pages to read…Fighting sleep, we still entertain hopes of revolutionary finds, fantastic rebel women, unknown facts about those who gained fame, controversies hidden among the yellowing pages. Yet in adopting this attitude, we are missing out on a far greater point. The very gesture of writing, when made by a woman, constitutes rebellion, and the conventionality of the text should not obscure this fact. Anachronism is the greatest power of any revolution. Many women, locked (quite literally) in their homes, using a narrative that mirrored what they had learnt, dreamt of freedom for themselves and others, whether that were aware of it or not. When they sat down to write, they created a moment just for themselves, and in doing so, they carved out a space  of their own freedom – small at first, but gradually expanding – where they created themselves. They wrote themselves. With time, they became the subject of writing by other women, their biographers. Discovering, documenting and researching this chain of women’s lives suddenly no longer seems boring.

The international conference, scheduled to take place over three days, will focus on discussing the latest methods of working with women’s personal documents, biographies and letters written on their basis. We are interested in strategies developed in contemporary historiography and literature studies, in particular interdisciplinary women’s, gender  and queer studies. We also have a strong interest in the experiences of researchers of herstory, oral history, and life writing. As for historical periods, we are interested mainly in the 1800s and the 1900s up to World War II. However, the true chronology will emerge out of the  documents themselves. We have decided to focus on journals, letters, diaries and autobiographies of women in that period because it is, in our opinion, unique: this is when among Western elites the discourse of women’s emancipation was articulated and started gaining popularity. Most women at the time responded with great reserve and even hostility, choosing instead to support the traditional understanding of gender roles.

Personal documents written by women in the 19th century are an excellent reflection of the ambivalence of their authors towards emancipation. Since the 1980s, many scholarly papers have been written to demonstrate that these texts, while ostensibly fitting with the conventions of gender representation, in fact undermine the traditional gender roles. Submission and its subversion, conservative attitudes and emancipation (if not overt, then expressed through a variety of strategies to promote empowerment and women’s agency) – they meet, often in surprising ways, in these conventionalized, seemingly uninteresting practices of women’s life writing.

Using the existing findings in the area of gender studies as a starting point, during the conference we will give the floor to researchers who will present other possibilities for  reading women’s personal writings, and reveal how we can access what often remains hidden under the surface of the texts which require a critical, contextualized reading. Together, we will discuss the interpretations that facilitate finding the seeds of rebellion and social revolution, while seemingly adhering to patriarchal norms (including formal and literary conventions).

On the first day the conference, we will focus on novel, critical approaches to  reading journals, letters, memoirs, and autobiographies written by women. We will discuss what survival strategies were reflected in women’s life writing, what this writing offered to its authors, what purposes it served, and how it influenced the next generations of its female readers.

On the second day the conference, we will investigate women’s biographic writing. How can archives be used to write biographies of 19th century women? What are the most interesting

projects in this area, and what outcomes have they produced so far? What challenges are to be expected in this type of work?

On the third day the conference, we will look at the possibilities that the instruments of digital humanities offer in archiving and digitally editing women’s life writing. Can digital archives and databases restore the memory of the women that have been forgotten, or is the opposite true – are they just a digital reinforcement of the traditional divisions and power (im)balances? We will discuss the most exciting projects, the new research tools, and the opportunities they offer.

During the conference key-note lectures will be delivered by such researchers as,  Prof. Sidonie Smith and Prof. Julia Watson, authors and editors of the groundbreaking book entitled “De/Colonizing the Subject: The Politics of Gender in Women’s Autobiography” , Prof. Cynthia Huff, author of many articles focused on women’s diaries and author of descriptive bibliographies of nineteenth-century women’s diaries, Prof. Andrea Pető, author of a biography of Júlia Rajk and author of books on women in Hungarian politics between 1945- 1951 and the female perpetrators in Hungary during World War II. The Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson lecture will be followed by a seminar devoted to their new book of essays,  which will be published in early 2017.

The conference is organized by the team behind the Women’s Archive, a division of the Institute of Literary Research, Polish Academy of Sciences (www.ibl.waw.pl) now engaged in a long-term project The Women’s Archive: writing (Archiwum kobiet: piszące). Co- organizers are the Digital Humanities Laboratory, University of Warsaw (www.lach.edu.pl) and the Institute of Slavic Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences (www.ispan.waw.pl).

The Conference “Convention and revolution. Life writing by women in the 1800s and 1900s: archives, critiques and methods” will take place at Staszic Palace in Warsaw, Poland November 27-December 1, 2017.

Conference fee for regular participants: 400 PLN/100 EUR
Conference fee for young scholars and PhD students: 200 PLN/50 EUR

Paper subissions please send till April 30, 2017 on email address:  convention_and_revolution2017@ibl.waw.pl

 

CALL FOR PAPERS! The Literary Encyclopedia is seeking articles in the field of Post-1945 Women’s Writing

The Literary Encyclopedia is seeking articles in the field of Post-1945 Women’s Writing. Please see the full CFP for details: 
https://www.litencyc.com/php/scribd_document.php?id=3

 CFP DOWNLOAD

CALL FOR PAPERS – ANGLOPHONE AFRICAN WRITING AND CULTURE

The Literary Encyclopedia at www.litencyc.com is looking for qualified writers to enhance its coverage of Anglophone African Writing and Culture of Africa. The list below is not comprehensive  or final, and new proposals of writers/ works/context essays that are not currently listed in our database are also welcome. However, we will prioritize articles on writers and works frequently studied in university courses, and those that are highly topical and well-known.

In addition to publishing articles on canonical and much-taught literary works, the Encyclopedia is also interested in making available information about important writers and works that are often neglected, and in publishing articles about discrete historical events which are relevant to literary understanding. It also seeks to broaden its scope to include more research-oriented articles with a pedagogic function, such as ‘Critical issues in title‘ or ‘Critical readings of author/ title‘. If you are interested in contributing such an essay, please contact the relevant volume editor or the managing editor.

All offers of contribution should come accompanied by an up-to-date CV and, in the case of doctoral students who wish to offer a contribution, also a short writing sample. The overwhelming majority (about 90%) of our contributors are academic scholars, while the remaining percentage is made up  of highly endorsed doctoral students and independent researchers.

The Literary Encyclopedia aims to deliver a global understanding of world literatures and cultures within an adaptable and responsive digital platform that’s ethically conceived, minimalist, but packing great functionality. All our articles are solicited by invitation from specialist scholars in higher education institutions all over the world, refereed and approved by subject editors in our Editorial Board. The LE is thus uniquely selective, reliable and authoritative. Its online format allows for rapid publication and frequent updating of articles; its integrated digital resources (author life-chronologies, customisable timelines, thematic or course-oriented bookshelves, related article clusters, critical bibliographies) respond dynamically to teaching and learning demands.

More detailed information on the Encyclopedia – including its publishing model, editorial policies, specific information for authors etc. – can be found on its homepage at www.litencyc.com, under  the ABOUT tab. In order to explore the kinds of content we publish please log in using the case- sensitive username: ‘WinterGuest2017′ and the password: ‘chekhov1860’.

We hope that you will wish to join us in this enterprise. If you wish to contribute, please contact the volume editors: Dr Helen Cousins (H.Cousins@staff.newman.ac.uk), Dr Madhu Krishnan (madhu.krishnan@bristol.ac.uk); Dr John Masterson (j.e.Masterson@sussex.ac.uk); or Ronit Frenkel (particularly for South and Southern African literature – ronitf@uj.ac.za) or the managing editor, Dr Cristina Sandru (cristinasandru@litencyc.com).

LITERARY AND CULTURAL CONTEXT ARTICLES

  • Farafina
  • Cassava Republic
  • FEMRITE
  • Africa39

AUTHOR/WORKS

  • Uwem Akpan
  • Elechi Amadi Ayi Kwei Armah
  • Sefi Atta
  • Kofi Awoonor
  • Doreen Baingana
  • Igoni Barrett
  • Brian Chikwava
  • Achmat Dangor
  • Amma Darko
  • Sello Duiker
  • Cyprian Ekwensi
  • Akachi Ezeigbo
  • Aminatta Forna
  • Damon Galgut
  • Goretti Kyomuhendo
  • Jowhor Ile
  • Kojo Laing
  • Okey Ndibe
  • Mũkoma wa Ngũgĩ
  • Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor
  • Tayeb Salih
  • Taiye Selasi
  • Lola Shoneyin
  • Chika Unigwe
  • Noo Saro-Wiwa

INDIVIDUAL WORKS

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

  • Americanah

 Ayi Kwei Armah

  • Beautyful Ones Are not Yet Born (1968)
  • Fragments (1971)

Syl Cheney-Coker

  • The Last Harmattan of Alusine Dunbar
  • Sacred River

 Aminatta Forna

  • The Memory of Love

 Flora Nwapa

Novels:

  • Efuru (1966)
  • Idu (1970)
  • Never Again (1975)
  • One Is Enough (1981)
  • Women are Different (1986) Short stories/poems collections:
  • This Is Lagos and Other Stories (1971)
  • Cassava Song and Rice Song (1986)
  • Wives at War and Other Stories (1980)

Grace Ogot

Novels:

  • The Promised Land: a novel (1966)

Short story collections:

  • Land Without Thunder (1968)
  • The Other Woman: selected short stories (1976)

 

Amos Tutuola

  • Palm-Wine Drinkard (1952)

Yvonne Vera

  • Why Don’t You Carve Other Animals (short stories) (1992)
  • Nehanda (1993)
  • Without a Name (1994)
  • Under the Tongue (1997)
  • Butterfly Burning (2000)
  • The Stone Virgins (2002)

 

deadline approaching! CALL FOR PAPERS! ‘Contemporary Women’s Writing: Apocalyptic Narratives’


deadline approaching!

by Sunday 15 January 2017 

An open call for contributions to the following panel session, to take place at the  conference (Newcastle Upon Tyne, 5-7 July 2017):

 ‘Contemporary Women’s Writing: Apocalyptic Narratives’

Session Chair: Fiona Tolan

The contemporary moment, it seems, lends itself to apocalyptic narratives. Environmental damage and extreme weather events; the shifting of the political mainstream to the far reaches of left and right; the financial crash and the exposed vulnerabilities of a globalised economy; the migrant crisis and mass displacement of populations: real world events repeatedly contribute to a pervasive sense of anxiety and crisis that is productively explored in contemporary women’s writing. From the commodification of the biosciences in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake, to the falling birth rate and falling temperatures of Maggie Gee’s The Ice People, contemporary women writers engaged in speculative fictions repeatedly utilise images of crisis and threat to explore political and cultural anxieties.

This panel brings together scholars interested in representations of apocalypse and apocalyptic scenarios in contemporary women’s writing. We invite contributions for papers that address women writers’ figuring of apocalyptic fictions in terms of themes such as (although not limited to):

  • Ecological disaster narratives
  • Post-humanism and cyborg identities
  • Globalisation and financial instability
  • New sciences and the reconfiguring of the ‘natural’
  • Threats to the body and bodily autonomy
  • Narratives of violence and threat
  • Reimagining identity politics in unstable futures

Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words, plus a brief biographical note, to f.tolan@ljmu.ac.uk by 15 January 2017.

CALL FOR PAPERS! ‘Contemporary Women’s Writing: Archiving for the Future’

by Sunday 15 January 2017

This is an open call for papers for a pre-constituted panel at the
English: Shared Futures conference which will take place in Newcastle
Upon Tyne, UK, 5th-7th July 2017.

 Contemporary Women’s Writings: Archiving for the Future’

Session Chair: Rosie White

How is contemporary women’s writing being remembered now and how will it
be remembered in the future?  This panel will address current work on
archival materials regarding contemporary women writers.
Regarding contemporary writing the writer in question may still be
alive, organising her own archive and the creation of her own legacies.
What are the implications of using private materials/reading personal
diaries by and about a living subject? How reliable is archived material
curated by the writer herself?  These issues raise questions about the
dichotomy between the deceased – and at times more fetishized – writer
and the living author who can still approach her archive with some sort
of agency
Where are contemporary women writers’ archives being lodged and how is
women’s writing being preserved and recorded for future generations? 
What does ‘the archive’ mean for contemporary women’s writing?  Whose
work is being archived and who remains absent from such a record?
We invite contributions from academics working on the archived materials
of contemporary women writers, addressing issues such as access to and
availability of materials, copyright negotiations and archival absences.  

We also invite abstracts which address issues such as the gender
politics of archival work in contemporary literary studies, the role of
the archive in canon formation and the technology of archives in an
online environment.

Please send 300 word proposals to rosemary.white@northumbria.ac.uk by 15th January 2017, with a short biographical note.

CALL FOR PAPERS! ‘Contemporary Women’s Writing: Apocalyptic Narratives’

by Sunday 15 January 2017

An open call for contributions to the following panel session, to take place at the  conference (Newcastle Upon Tyne, 5-7 July 2017):

 ‘Contemporary Women’s Writing: Apocalyptic Narratives’

Session Chair: Fiona Tolan

The contemporary moment, it seems, lends itself to apocalyptic narratives. Environmental damage and extreme weather events; the shifting of the political mainstream to the far reaches of left and right; the financial crash and the exposed vulnerabilities of a globalised economy; the migrant crisis and mass displacement of populations: real world events repeatedly contribute to a pervasive sense of anxiety and crisis that is productively explored in contemporary women’s writing. From the commodification of the biosciences in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake, to the falling birth rate and falling temperatures of Maggie Gee’s The Ice People, contemporary women writers engaged in speculative fictions repeatedly utilise images of crisis and threat to explore political and cultural anxieties.

This panel brings together scholars interested in representations of apocalypse and apocalyptic scenarios in contemporary women’s writing. We invite contributions for papers that address women writers’ figuring of apocalyptic fictions in terms of themes such as (although not limited to):

  • Ecological disaster narratives
  • Post-humanism and cyborg identities
  • Globalisation and financial instability
  • New sciences and the reconfiguring of the ‘natural’
  • Threats to the body and bodily autonomy
  • Narratives of violence and threat
  • Reimagining identity politics in unstable futures

Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words, plus a brief biographical note, to f.tolan@ljmu.ac.uk by 15 January 2017.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS! Latecomers: Anita Brookner Then and Now

CFP for Latecomers: Anita Brookner Then and Now
by Friday 16 December, 2016

Latecomers: Anita Brookner Then and Now
Presented by The University of Melbourne
Venue: National Gallery of Victoria (International), 17-18 March 2017

Overview

 The work of Anita Brookner occupies an ambiguous place in the literary field. Brookner has a cult status, was a Booker-Prize winner and best-selling novelist, and yet her work received what she herself deemed ‘censorious’ reviews and limited critical attention. Brookner’s death was accompanied by conflicted accolades that appeared to celebrate her life while restating the predictable (and vexatious) reading of her identity as a lonely, single woman.

In addition to her 24 novels and one novella, Brookner authored a number of art-historical works and was a prolific reviewer of art and literature for over 60 years. The critical reception of Brookner is complicated by the question of how to interpret her work as an historian of eighteenth- an nineteenth-century French art. In a 1984 interview, Brookner explicitly denied a connection between her fictional and critical oeuvres, while at other times she spoke more openly about an intertextual literary practice, the significance of Romanticism in contemporary life, and her belief in unconscious processes.

Keynote speakers

  • Associate Professor Patricia Juliana Smith, Hofstra University

  • Professor Peter McPhee, The University of Melbourne

Call for papers

We invite papers on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Brookner’s canons

  • Brookner’s Romanticism

  • Brookner’s Rococo

  • Brookner’s art-historical oeuvre

  • Brookner and the French Revolution

  • Intertexuality

  • Women’s writing

  • Gender and sexuality

  • Anachronism, temporality and periodisation

  • The early novels, the middle period, the late period

  • Brookner’s London

  • Brookner’s Europes

  • Brooknerines

Please email abstracts of no more than 250 words and a brief CV to the conference convenors, Dr Peta Mayer and Associate Professor Clara Tuite, The University of Melbourne. Email: latecomers@unimelb.edu.au

Please note: Closing date is Friday 16 December 2016.

CALL FOR PAPERS! the Annual Meeting of the Comparative Literature Association (ACLA 2017)

CFP for ACLA 2017

the Annual Meeting of the Comparative Literature Association
by July 31, 2016

http://www.acla.org/annual-meeting

ACLA 2017
We are writing to invite you or anyone you think might be interested to submit proposals to a seminar we will be submitting for the Annual Meeting of the Comparative Literature Association to be celebrated at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, on July 6-9, 2017. Individual paper proposals will not be due until September but, since the ACLA’s annual
conferences have a distinctive structure in which most papers are grouped into twelve-person seminars that meet two hours per day for three days of the conference, we would like to start considering as many participants as possible before the portal opens in September for paper submissions. We also hope to produce a co-edited volume of essays including extended and revised versions of some of the papers on this seminar.

Wild-ing Subjects: Queer Contestations in Latin/o America between 1900 and 1970

This seminar seeks to address the various ways in which cultural and literary productions emerging in Latin/o America from 1900 to 1970 have contested some of the tenets at the foundation of cultural  historiography as it is often articulated. Within this cultural history, it is oftentimes overlooked how cultural artifacts, intellectual trajectories and
creative subjects‹whether or not they introduce themselves as queer or
dissident in actuality do enact forms of intervention that can be called queer or wild, following Jack J. Halberstams terminology. The presentations on this three-day seminar will invoke a new understanding of Latin/o American cultural history and its archives by engaging theories and methods that are wild in that they fail disciplinary knowledge, to quote Halberstam (Charming for the Revolution 7). The potential of a queer wildness as
explored by J. Halberstam and José Esteban Muñoz will serve to trigger a different understanding of improvised, surprising, or collaborative interventions that have been read as ³nonsensical and inconsequential. Instead, such interventions will be seen as failing and surpassing traditional understandings of nation and national belonging, practices of sociality, gender & genre hierarchies, sexuality and desire, the production and consumption of cultural goods, relationships among bodies and objects, temporalities and spatialities. Like Muñoz, Halberstam confesses, I seek a queer vitality that we might call wildness that skews towards collapse and works always on behalf of failure² (³Wildness,
Loss, Death 141,147). We invite papers that explore contributions staging this vitality in Latin/o America and help reconfigure and unsettle the Latin/o American archive. In so doing, this seminar aims to unravel new readings and break away from conventional hegemonic narratives of Latin/o American culture.

Send 300-500 word abstracts and bios to
Claudia Cabello Hutt at 
c_cabell@uncg.edu
Mariela Méndez at mmendezd@richmond.edu
by July 31, 2016

Mariela Méndez de Coudriet, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Latin American, Latino and Iberian Studies
Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
330 Carole Weinstein International Center
University of Richmond, VA 23173
www.marielamendez.com

Calls for papers by MA students: “American Youth” (of American studies or related fields)

 

2015-08-24_171538

 


*** CALL FOR PAPERS ***

We would like to kindly ask for your help in distributing our calls for papers to students of American studies or related fields. aspeers, the first and currently only MA-level peer-reviewed journal for American studies in Europe, will accept submissions by 18 October 2015. 
 

In its ninth issue, aspeers will feature a general section and a topical focus. While the general section accepts submissions on any American studies topic (e.g. revised versions of term papers or chapters from BA theses), the topical section will focus on the theme of “American Youth,” calling for submissions that reflect on the diverse roles and meanings of ‘youth’ in American culture.

Please find the two calls for papers below. More information can also be found at www.aspeers.com/2016

We would be very grateful if you could point your students to this opportunity to get published early on in their career and to gain experience with the process of publishing academic work. We are certain that you have students you find worthy of submitting something and look forward to seeing contributions from your MA students.

 === General Call for Papers ===

For the general section of its ninth issue, aspeers seeks outstanding academic writing demonstrating the excellence of graduate scholarship,
the range of concerns scrutinized in the field, and the diversity of perspectives employed. We thus explicitly invite revised versions of
term papers or chapters from theses written by students of European Master (and equivalent) programs. For this section, there are no topical
limitations. Contributions should be up to 10,000 words (including abstract and list of works cited). The submission deadline is 18 October
2015.

 === Topical Call for Papers on “American Youth” ===

When Theodore Roosevelt spoke of America as a “young giant of the West,” a “nation glorious in youth and strength,” at the Republican National Convention in 1900, he inserted himself into a long rhetorical tradition: Whether in promise or in criticism, identifying ‘youth’ with America and calling the US a nation that is yet to grow up constitutes a well-established trope in discussions of ‘Americanness.’ At the same time, adolescence and youth are core concepts at the heart of American literature and culture, and they are at the center of many contemporary debates. From the ‘American Dream,’ a coming-of-age story of sorts, to debates about the education sector, from moral panics about ‘juvenile
delinquency’ to stories about America’s youngest entrepreneurs, and from Huckleberry Finn to the controversial No Child Left Behind Act, childhood and adolescence are focal lenses in thinking about ‘America,’ inviting at least two complementary perspectives: one in which youth is a trope frequently tied to ‘America’ and one in which youth is a concern with deep cultural resonance in American culture.

For its ninth issue, aspeers thus dedicates the topical section to “American Youth” and invites European graduate students to critically and analytically explore the particular relationship between notions of youth and American culture. With a host of disciplines–ranging from political science and history to medicine, legal studies, literary and cultural studies, economy, and beyond–devoting scholarship to this topic, we welcome papers from the various fields, methodologies, and approaches that comprise American studies as well as inter- and transdisciplinary submissions. Potential paper topics could cover (but are not limited to):


 * explorations of the role of youth, childhood, or adolescence in American literature, broadly conceived, including movies, novels, video games, TV shows, graphic novels, or other texts that talk about coming  of age

* discussions of the cultural history of childhood, of notions of youth,  or of growing up as they intersect with categories of difference such as   race, class, or gender

* analyses of the politics of childhood, be they contemporary or  historical, and on how these speak of social dynamics within American society
* papers that approach youth via its complementary ‘other,’ (old) ageaspeers, the first and currently only graduate-level peer-reviewed journal of European American studies, encourages fellow MA students from all fields to reflect on the diverse meanings of youth for American culture. Please note that the contributions we are looking for might address or go beyond the topical parameters outlined above. We welcome term papers, excerpts from theses, or papers specifically written for the ninth issue of aspeers by 18 October 2015. If you are seeking to publish work beyond this topic, please refer to our general Call for Papers. Please consult our submission guidelines and find some  additional tips at www.aspeers.com/2016.